Site icon Roberta T. Ballard, Ph.D., LLC

About

Hi! I’m Dr. Roberta Ballard. 

Most people call me Bobbi.

Pronouns: She/her

As a psychologist, one of the most rewarding things I do is to work with creative professionals and artists who are burning themselves out. They often deal with chronic depression and anxiety; in addition, being true to themselves can feel like they’re swimming against the tide — and it can be exhausting.

Dr. Roberta Ballard, psychologist

If this sounds like you, then I can relate, and you are in the right place for help. I’m familiar with the grind of chronic depression and anxiety, and the important role creativity plays in coping with these struggles.

In fact, I don’t know what I’d do without my creative pursuits. At various times, I’ve been a drummer in post-punk bands, cellist, floral designer, painter, knitter, and jewelry maker. I currently make a lot of mixed media art, much of which resembles demented flower gardens (see what I mean?).

My doctoral dissertation research studied musical performance anxiety in rock musicians. It was inspired by my own musical performance anxiety, as well as talking to other bands about their experiences with anxiety. If you deal with performance anxiety, I can help you develop skills and practices to do your best with less agony!

Being creative is a part of what keeps me healthy and thriving. I’m currently working on an art project that I’ll publish as a book. This project helped me process some strong feelings I have about my recent forensic work in the criminal legal system. (I’ll link to it when it’s ready.)

My favorite part of my work as a psychologist is connecting with people and helping them suffer less and experience increased creativity, joy and ease.

My office is in Marietta, Georgia, but I am authorized to see therapy clients in online counseling in 29 states

Feedback I’ve had from therapy clients is that I’m accepting, warm, and perceptive. Therapy with me is both deeply personal and highly actionable. I have a rich tool box of practical skills to share with clients, so that we alleviate your distress and give you new skills to use outside of session. 

I also pay attention to overarching themes and core patterns that tend to hold people back. In other words, we usually address both current challenges and long-standing issues. This is especially the case if there are lingering issues from growing up in an alcoholic, addicted, or dysfunctional home. Underlying my work with clients is encouraging greater self-acceptance, and supporting foundational health and lifestyle changes. 

Many therapists think it’s not okay to share their personal views, but that’s not me.

I am an LGBTQ+ ally, a feminist, antiracist, and a defender of racial and social justice. Personal work recognizing my own privilege and working through my own latent biases is challenging, lifelong, and humbling. As a therapist, I pay attention to the impact of systemic injustice, and the potential trauma that it inflicts, on my clients. I identify as a straight, cisgender woman. I am a fiercely protective and loving family member to two bi women.

Here are some nitty gritty details about my qualifications:

Credentials for Dr. Roberta Ballard

I love working with creative people struggling with anxiety and depression. They tend to be intuitive and striving individuals, who accomplish so much once their energy is restored and channeled in a healthy way. I’m so grateful to have a job guiding people in the direction of health and fulfillment.

Let’s Talk! Schedule a free 15-minute phone call with me.

Press & Interviews with

Dr. Roberta Ballard:

verywellmind:

How to Ignore the News, and Whether or Not You Should

Long Term Antidepressant Use Doesn’t Always Mean Better Quality of Life

PsychCentral:

Is Anger a Symptom of Grief?

What are Anxiety Dreams and What Causes Them?

Depression and Weight Gain: All You Need to Know

How to Help Someone Who is Stressed

8 Ways to Build Vulnerability in Relationships

Other press:

Choosing Therapy: Journal Prompts for Anxiety

Mental Health Match: Can Chronic Depression Be Cured? (republish of my blog article)

Featured in two episodes of the true crime TV show “Very Bad Men”

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